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3 kinds of reasonable accommodations you could request at work

Few laws have done as much to protect people with disabling medical conditions as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA establishes protections for those with medical issues that affect their job performance or their needs in an educational environment. The law also requires that businesses open to public work to accommodate those with disabilities as well. 

One of the most important requirements of the ADA is the obligation of an employer to provide reasonable accommodations that would keep a worker on the job. What are some examples of reasonable accommodations that an injured or ill worker could request?

Assistive technology

Sometimes, the company needs to purchase devices or tools that will make your job easier for you to perform. Software that reads information displayed on the screen could be one example. Although there may be an investment involved, providing assistive technology can help workers do the same tasks as other people in the same role.

Adjustments to the work schedule or duties

A worker who cannot stand for more than half an hour at a time may need to change when they work to take multiple breaks. Workers may need to go from full-time to part-time or even ask for remote work to avoid the physical strain of traveling into work every day. Workers could also request adjustments of their job responsibilities to perform the work without needing rest or support.

Changes to the facilities

Buildings don’t always reflect the needs of those with physical limitations. You may need an elevator, a ramp or a more accessible bathroom to continue doing your job. 

Requesting reasonable accommodations from your employer can help you continue working, but it could also attract their ire and result in discrimination. Recognizing refused accommodations as a form of workplace disability discrimination can help you fight back for yourself and others who might work for the company later.

 

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