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sexual harassment at work Archives

Research provides insight into the aftermath of MeToo

A study that was just recently released found that some men in Florida and throughout the country are more hesitant to work with woman. The research was conducted by the University of Houston during 2018, which was the peak of MeToo awareness. Survey participants were also questioned in 2019 after the movement somewhat faded out of the public spotlight. Of men who took part in the survey, 27% said that they don't meet alone with female colleagues.

Sexual harassment in the hospitality industry

As awareness about sexual harassment in the workplace grows, bars in Florida and around the country may also need to examine their practices and make sure they are protecting employees and customers. A July conference in New Orleans included a session on dealing with sexual harassment and violence in the hospitality industry. One of the key points from the panel was that focusing on the role of alcohol was a distraction. Furthermore, hospitality does not mean ignoring bad behavior from customers.

Games company settles sexual harassment lawsuit

Women workers in a wide range of industries continue to deal with harassment and discrimination on the job in Florida and other states. Riot Games, the developer of the widely popular "League of Legends," recently settled a class-action lawsuit that had been brought by workers who said they were subject to sex discrimination in the workplace. The lawsuit, brought in November 2018, also alleged that the company violated California's Equal Pay Act. It was filed after a journalist's report highlighted instances of sexist culture and mistreatment of female employees at the company. Several current and former workers spoke to journalists about problems at the games manufacturer.

Employers can take steps to prevent sexual harassment

Despite legal requirements that employers in Florida provide their employees with safe workplaces, sexual harassment remains a serious problem. To develop sexual harassment training with a results-oriented approach, employers should define goals, use group discussions and provide a call to action. Defining goals allows for the creation of a safety-oriented work culture. Employers should choose verbiage that has company-specific meaning. Every industry and organization has its own objectives and vernacular. Making use of relevant language gives the exercise resonance.

Stopping sexual harassment requires employer-employee cooperation

Despite the growing number of people who speak up when they are being sexually harassed, it is still a problem in Florida and across the nation. Simply drawing attention to the challenges workers face when confronted with sexual harassment is insufficient to make lasting changes. Often, workers are unaware of what steps they can take to stop the behavior and even seek compensation. There are strategies to address sexual harassment and it is important to understand them.

Actress quits "The Rookie" over sexual harassment

Florida fans of the ABC crime series "The Rookie" might be concerned to learn that actress Afton Williamson has announced that she's leaving the show due to the sexual harassment and racial discrimination she allegedly experienced on the show's Los Angeles set while filming the first season. She made the announcement in an Instagram post on Aug. 4.

Camera operator for 'Criminal Minds' files lawsuit

Floridians who are fans of "Criminal Minds" might be interested in learning about a lawsuit that was recently filed against the show's production studio and network. The lawsuit was filed by a camera operator who has alleged that a supervisor subjected him to sexual harassment from the time that he was hired in 2011 until 2019.

Study finds less sexual harassment, more gender harassment

For Florida women, there might have been a drop in the amount of sexual harassment they experience at work. However, they might be experiencing a higher rate of sexist remarks and sexist discrimination. Researchers at the University of Colorado found that while 66% of the hundreds of women they surveyed reported sexual harassment at work in 2016, that number dropped to 25% in 2018. However, the percentage of women who experienced what researchers called "gender harassment" increased from 76% to 93%.

Survey finds sexual harassment to be relatively common

Employers in Florida and throughout the country are generally required to provide workplaces that are free from sexual and other types of harassment. However, a study conducted by Pan Atlantic Research of Portland found that this isn't necessarily the case for individuals living in Maine. Of those who responded, 21.9% of men and 23.4% of women said that they had seen sexual harassment take place at work. Furthermore, 57.6% of female respondents said that they had been victims of such harassment themselves.

Vascular surgeons are victims of workplace sexual haassment

According to survey results presented at a Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Annual Meeting, more than 40% of vascular surgeons reported experiencing sexual harassment at the workplace. The anonymous survey asked surgeons from health care facilities and training sites in Florida and other states whether they had experienced harassment of various forms. Nearly one in three of the respondents said they thought harassment was common in surgical specialties.

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