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sexual harassment at work Archives

Tech companies end forced arbitration for sexual harassment

Workers in Florida and across the country have been speaking out about the harms caused by mandatory arbitration policies when applied to sexual harassment on the job. Facebook and Google both announced that they would end their policies that forced employees to go to arbitration over incidents of sexual harassment and even assaults. Media coverage and employee walkouts have highlighted the frustration of workers at the tech giants over how their complaints have been handled. Facebook said that it is changing its agreements to make arbitration optional rather than mandatory.

Workplace harassment after the #MeToo movement

The #MeToo movement has made headlines in Florida and other states as many high-profile women have come forward with accounts of sexual harassment. According to a recent survey, employers believed that instances of sexual harassment have decreased while workers believed otherwise.

McDonald's workers striking to protest harassment

Women who work at some Florida McDonald's restaurants are among those who participated in walkouts to protest the company's handling of sexual harassment. On Sept. 18, female workers at McDonald's locations in 10 major cities planned to walk out of work during the lunch rush. The protests come after an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint was filed against McDonald's in May.

More than a third of workers experience on-the-job harassment

Boca Raton employees may not be surprised to learn that over a third of workers around the country have suffered from harassment in the workplace, according to a study. In addition, half of those workers were harassed due to their sex or gender. The study was conducted by Hiscox, an international insurance company.

Flight attendant alleges sexual harassment from pilot

Florida frequent flyers might be interested to learn that on Aug. 9, a lawsuit was filed against United Airlines by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a female flight attendant who says she experienced sexual harassment and a hostile work environment for years and the airline did nothing to help her. The lawsuit says a pilot posted images online of the flight attendant that were sexually explicit and sometimes included information such as her name and her home airport.

High rates of sexual harassment in the media industry

Media professionals in Florida and across the United States are more likely to be subject to unwanted sexual advances at work than in other sectors. According to the results of research conducted by the Center for Talent Innovation, 41 percent of women who work in American media companies report having endured lewd comments, inappropriate attention and other workplace harassment issues during their careers.

Research explores motivations driving sexual harassers

Boca Raton workers facing sexual harassment on the job may wonder what drives their employers to engage in or permit this type of threatening or hostile conduct. Some theories hold that powerful men are prone to harass their female subordinates because they feel entitled to exercise their power over others and enjoy a narcissistic thrill, especially when the women in question are afraid to resist. However, some research indicates that one common cause of sexual harassment is the insecurity of male bosses.

#MeToo movement casts light on corporate harassment policies

The #MeToo movement began with a series of sexual harassment allegations in the film industry, but it didn't stop there. Employees throughout Florida and the rest of the country are now voicing their concerns about harassment in the workplace. In the wake of these allegations, many major corporations have taken a fresh look at their sexual harassment policies.

Why sexual harassment training courses fail

While there is a greater emphasis on preventing sexual harassment in the workplace, harassment training programs are still likely to fail. There are six key reasons why Florida companies and others may miss the mark when it comes to educating their workers about this problem. First, employees may suspect that their employers are conducting the training to satisfy legal requirements, and that is a sure way to get them to tune out.

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