Law Office of William M. Julien, P.A.
Contact us for a FREE appointment
561-995-9990
866-569-7398
E-mail Us

Quid Pro Quo Sexual Harassment Archives

What exactly is quid pro quo harassment in the workplace?

In all employment situations, employees are expected to perform some type of work in exchange for their paycheck and various company benefits. It is a sort of trade agreement. The employee gets "something for something-which happens to be the Latin translation for Quid Pro Quo.

Investigating a Quid Pro Quo Claim

If you don't have much knowledge of quid pro quo sexual harassment, you are in the same boat as many others. While some have heard of this, not many are familiar with the finer details, including how it could impact them at their place of employment.

How to better understand quid pro quo sexual harassment

Despite federal and state laws, as well as workplace policies against sexual harassment, this remains a problem throughout the country. There will always be times when one person thinks he or she has the right to sexually harass a coworker. When this happens, a hostile work environment is created.

Understanding quid pro quo sexual harassment

As an employee in the state of Florida you have many rights, some of which you may not even be aware of. It is important for you to know right from wrong in the workplace, as this allows you to act in an appropriate manner while also dealing with any action from another worker that may be considered crossing the line.

What is the legal definition of quid pro quo sexual harassment?

Quid pro quo is Latin for "this for that" or "something for something." The legal definition of quid pro quo sexual harassment is therefore promising something to an employee in exchange for a sexual favor. Examples of quid pro quo sexual harassment include:

Quid pro quo: when boss makes harassment condition of employment

Did you know that 80 percent of female farmworkers have experienced sexual harassment while on the job? That data was derived from a study conducted in 2010. It certainly isn't in their job descriptions, but some employers end up making the hostile working environment a condition of employment.

Email Us For A Response

Set Up A Free Initial Consultation ( Bold labels are required )

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy