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September 2019 Archives

A fired worker may have a cause of action

In the perfect world, employers and employees would work harmoniously together for their shared interests. In reality, however, there is often conflict between the two, which often leaves the worker with little choice: comply or find another job. One of the reasons Florida employers wield so much power is because most Florida workers are considered at-will, meaning they can be fired for any reason or no reason at all. But that power to terminate is not without limits.

How the ADA protects employee rights

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 makes it illegal for most employers to discriminate against qualified workers who are disabled. Furthermore, it is also illegal for employers to retaliate against a person for taking action to defend their rights under the ADA. Individuals who work for private employers with 15 or more employees can file disability discrimination charges with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Those who work for a government organization can file a complaint with the Department of Justice.

Sexual harassment a pervasive problem in health care

Sexual harassment is a more prevalent problem in some industries than in others. If you make your living working in a doctor’s office, hospital or similar environment, you may be more likely to experience it than you would otherwise. If you work in health care and are also female, you face an even higher risk of experiencing on-the-job sexual harassment, with many female doctors and medical students alike reporting experiencing this type of treatment at some point during their academic or professional career.

What to know about racial discrimination at work

Employers in Florida and throughout the United States ate not allowed to discriminate against workers based on their skin color or ethnicity. They are also not allowed to discriminate based on other attributes such as national origin per the terms of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Discrimination can occur whether an employer intended to do so or not. In other words, a policy could violate the terms of the Civil Rights Act even if it was designed to apply to everyone.

Employees claim Google is still retaliating against them

Workers in Florida and throughout the country may recall the walkout engineered by Google employees in 2018. Roughly 20,000 people took part in the event protesting the company's treatment of executives who were accused of sexual harassment. Although Google said that it would work to be more supportive of those who reported such issues, employees say that this isn't the case. Employees have also said that they were demoted or otherwise retaliated against after bringing their concerns to HR.

Woman files suit after employer retaliates

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, more than 50% of claims filed with the agency in 2018 were related to retaliation by employers. Generally speaking, employers in Florida and around the country are not allowed to retaliate against employees for taking part in a protected activity. For instance, an employee cannot be punished for making a sexual harassment or gender discrimination complaint against a company. In some cases, retaliation can occur even if a company didn't engage in harassment or discrimination.

Research provides insight into the aftermath of MeToo

A study that was just recently released found that some men in Florida and throughout the country are more hesitant to work with woman. The research was conducted by the University of Houston during 2018, which was the peak of MeToo awareness. Survey participants were also questioned in 2019 after the movement somewhat faded out of the public spotlight. Of men who took part in the survey, 27% said that they don't meet alone with female colleagues.

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