Florida Leave of Absence Rights

By law, employees throughout Florida are allowed leaves of absence from their jobs for certain conditions.

While these types of leave are protected by state and federal law, some employers may try to persuade an employee not to take the time he or she is legally granted. This could include intimidation tactics, threats to terminate his or her job or an outright denial of requests for time off. As these leaves are protected by law, attempts to block an employee from taking leave are considered discrimination. If the person is fired for taking leave anyway, he or she has the option to file a wrongful termination claim.

At Law Office of William M. Julien, P.A., we help employees understand their employment rights and the legal options available to them, given the specific details of their situation. Our attorneys will thoroughly investigate the circumstances surrounding the discrimination and help the individual file a claim against the company, preserving his or her rights.

If you suspect that you are being discriminated against because you are taking a legally protected leave of absence at work, call our Boca Raton law office today at 561-995-9990 or toll free at 866-569-7398 to discuss your claim.

Protecting Your Florida Leave of Absence Rights

Some of the most common types of protected leaves of absence include:

  • Family medical leave (FMLA) - One of the most common reasons an employee must take a leave of absence at work is to tend to medical circumstances, either for themselves personally or for an immediate family member. This can include the birth of a child or caring for a close relative during a difficult medical situation. The individual can take as much as 12 weeks of unpaid leave within a 12-month time frame.
  • Jury duty - Employers are required to allow individuals time off work to serve jury duty, regardless of how long the case may take.
  • Military leave of absence - Florida employers must preserve the employment and jobs or members of the military who are deployed or activated for certain duties, including training, for up to five years. When they return, the military members must be given their jobs back.
  • Domestic violence - Employers must allow victims of domestic violence up to three days within a 12-month period to handle circumstances related to violence.

We will provide you with the answers and information you need to understand how best to proceed in protecting your employment rights. Our Boca Raton employment lawyers will advocate on your behalf at each step in the process.